+91-124 - 4595300info@cruisebooking.in

21-Day Brazil & The Amazon

 
 
21-Day Brazil & The Amazon
Starting from $6,499*

Buenos Aires, Argentina to Manaus, Brazil


Ship: Seabourn Quest


Departure Date :

Mar 15 2020

Optional tours are available from most ports for an additional charge.

 

Itinerary

 
Day Buenos Aires, Argentina
--
"In the early 20th century, Buenos Aires, Argentina, gained immense wealth when it began shipping its pampas-raised beef around the world. It quickly entered the club of great world cities, and a slew of attractions and architectural jewels soon arose. Since that time, the capital has experienced huge swings in economic and political fortune. But Buenos Aires continues to fascinate and entertain sightseeing visitors, both for its chaotic energy and for its sheer urban beauty. Thankfully, the Belle Époque grandeur and enormous tracts of greenery remain. Any list of things to do in Buenos Aires would begin with its many walkable neighborhoods; Palermo especially stands out, thanks to creative residents who have pushed the restaurant scene well beyond beef. Porteños—as the locals are called—may be of Spanish, Italian, Jewish or Middle Eastern descent; that mix of cultures is reflected in the city's dialect, foods and pastimes. Looking beyond the city's sights, Buenos Aires is known as the birthplace of tango, and while the music and dance never quite went away, today tango is making a resurgence. Fans come here from around the world to take part in or watch the milongas (dance events). Argentines are world leaders in polo as well, and as the sport captures the interest of more and more travelers, hunky players like Nacho are gaining global celebrity. "
Buenos Aires, Argentina
 
 
Day Buenos Aires, Argentina
Departs 05:00 PM
"In the early 20th century, Buenos Aires, Argentina, gained immense wealth when it began shipping its pampas-raised beef around the world. It quickly entered the club of great world cities, and a slew of attractions and architectural jewels soon arose. Since that time, the capital has experienced huge swings in economic and political fortune. But Buenos Aires continues to fascinate and entertain sightseeing visitors, both for its chaotic energy and for its sheer urban beauty. Thankfully, the Belle Époque grandeur and enormous tracts of greenery remain. Any list of things to do in Buenos Aires would begin with its many walkable neighborhoods; Palermo especially stands out, thanks to creative residents who have pushed the restaurant scene well beyond beef. Porteños—as the locals are called—may be of Spanish, Italian, Jewish or Middle Eastern descent; that mix of cultures is reflected in the city's dialect, foods and pastimes. Looking beyond the city's sights, Buenos Aires is known as the birthplace of tango, and while the music and dance never quite went away, today tango is making a resurgence. Fans come here from around the world to take part in or watch the milongas (dance events). Argentines are world leaders in polo as well, and as the sport captures the interest of more and more travelers, hunky players like Nacho are gaining global celebrity. "
Buenos Aires, Argentina
 
 
Day Punta del Este, Uruguay
Arrives 08:00 AM Departs 06:00 PM
For years, Punta del Este was one of those places that travel writers would describe as “sleepy.” With a population of laid-back permanent residents numbering just under 10,000, there wasn't a lot going on in this town in the remote southeastern corner of Uruguay. But then the news got out. Punta del Este began to be referred to as the Hamptons of South America, and—more alluring still—as the continent's own St.-Tropez. In other words, Punta del Este was a gorgeous coast and a safe and moneyed port city: perfect for a vacation. It's the preferred getaway for wealthy Uruguayans and Argentines and many have second homes here. The population swells with these part-time residents and sun-seeking vacationers during the winter, when quiet Punta del Este cedes to its alter ego of glitzy, glamorous resort town. In addition to soaking up sun on the beautiful beaches and swimming in turquoise waters, visitors enjoy shopping at upscale boutiques, exploring the local art scene, trying their luck at a casino and tasting fresh-from-the-sea specialties at Punta del Este's restaurants.
Punta del Este, Uruguay
 
 
Day Montevideo, Uruguay
Arrives 08:00 AM Departs 06:00 PM
"Uruguay’s capital, Montevideo, often gets overshadowed by her larger, flashier sister across the Río de la Plata, Buenos Aires. While Montevideo may not have quite the bustle of Argentina’s capital, it shares that city’s cosmopolitan atmosphere and, of course, excellent steak houses. Its smaller size is also an advantage: There is a relaxed feel to this more low-key counterpart to BA. Montevideo has a surprising mix of neighborhoods. The Ciudad Vieja, with its grid of streets on a peninsula separating the Río de la Plata from the harbor, is the colonial heart. Long neglected, it has recently undergone a renaissance—restaurants, bars and clubs are opening in historic buildings that have been meticulously restored. Montevideo’s downtown is a treasure trove of Art Deco buildings, while the newer eastern suburbs may evoke Miami for visitors. Gleaming skyscrapers and open-air cafés overlook beaches that run for miles."
Montevideo, Uruguay
 
 
Day At Sea

 
 
Day At Sea

 
 
Day Ilhabela (Sao Sebastiao), Brazil
Arrives 08:00 AM Departs 05:00 PM
"Volcanic peaks, stunning beaches, dense tropical jungle and some 360 waterfalls—it's no wonder Ilhabela translates to ""beautiful island"" from its unofficial Portuguese name (though officially known as São Sebastião Island, nobody dares call it anything but beautiful!). Separated from the Brazilian mainland and the town of São Sebastião by a narrow strait, the 360-square-kilometer (139-square-mile) island is the chic getaway of choice for Paulistas (natives of the city of São Paulo), who flock here for its secluded sun-toasted sands, boutique hotels, trendy restaurants and unadulterated nature (85 percent of the island has been turned into a park and UNESCO-protected biosphere). Mainstay pastimes here include beach-lazing with a caipirinha (Brazil's national cocktail, made with a sugarcane-distilled spirit known as cachaça plus sugar and limes) at the ready; water sports; trekking; and frolicking among the rich and fabulous. Whether you're diving deep into its cerulean waters in search of 16th- and 17th-century pirate shipwrecks (or windsurfing over them!), jungle hiking alongside toucans and capuchin monkeys or just plopping yourself down on any number of its idyllic beaches, Ilhabela makes no apologies for its position as São Paulo’s cosmopolitan island escape. Ain't she beautiful? "
Ilhabela (Sao Sebastiao), Brazil
 
 
Day Rio de Janeiro, Brazil
Arrives 08:00 AM
"Some cities need no introduction, and even fewer cities live up to their reputation the way Rio de Janeiro does, in both the best sense—how visitors experience sheer exhilaration being there—and the harsh reality of its social and economic strains. Situated in arguably the world’s most dramatic urban setting, it has apartment complexes that hang on huge granite peaks which rise smack in the middle of the city, and adding to the drama, its stunning beaches seem to stretch forever. A quick course in Rio: Before arriving, listen to some bossa nova and samba music to get in the swing of things. Second lesson: Practice pronouncing Rio as Hio in order to sound like a native Carioca. After that, it’s all about stopping at corner juice bars to enjoy fresh tropical drinks named for fruit you’ve never even heard of, and indulging in people-watching along the legendary Copacabana and Ipanema boardwalks. For more insight into the city, you might take the plunge into Maracaña Stadium to watch a crazy match between crosstown rivals Flamengo and Fluminense (imagine the Yankees and the Red Sox living in the same city) or jump on a bike to discover some of Rio’s far-flung and vastly diverse districts. "
Rio de Janeiro, Brazil
 
 
Day Rio de Janeiro, Brazil
Departs 06:00 PM
"Some cities need no introduction, and even fewer cities live up to their reputation the way Rio de Janeiro does, in both the best sense—how visitors experience sheer exhilaration being there—and the harsh reality of its social and economic strains. Situated in arguably the world’s most dramatic urban setting, it has apartment complexes that hang on huge granite peaks which rise smack in the middle of the city, and adding to the drama, its stunning beaches seem to stretch forever. A quick course in Rio: Before arriving, listen to some bossa nova and samba music to get in the swing of things. Second lesson: Practice pronouncing Rio as Hio in order to sound like a native Carioca. After that, it’s all about stopping at corner juice bars to enjoy fresh tropical drinks named for fruit you’ve never even heard of, and indulging in people-watching along the legendary Copacabana and Ipanema boardwalks. For more insight into the city, you might take the plunge into Maracaña Stadium to watch a crazy match between crosstown rivals Flamengo and Fluminense (imagine the Yankees and the Red Sox living in the same city) or jump on a bike to discover some of Rio’s far-flung and vastly diverse districts. "
Rio de Janeiro, Brazil
 
 
Day Armacao dos Buzios, Brazil
Arrives 07:00 AM Departs 02:00 PM
"The spindly Brazilian peninsula of Armação dos Búzios, or just Búzios, is loaded with hills and fine bays as well as coves where long ago pirates were able to stash their booty and themselves. In the state of Rio de Janeiro, and about a two-hour drive from the city of Rio, the popular resort area is made up of a handful of hamlets spread over some 30 square miles and encompassing nearly two dozen beaches. Dotted with cacti and dry tropical woods, the peninsula was a slaving station before its economic roles morphed into that of fishing villages and a whaling base (an armação was a fish drying rack, while búzios means ""whelks"" in Portuguese). The main town has a cool Mediterranean-on-the-Atlantic vibe that began when Brigitte Bardot famously showed up in the mid-'60s and launched its fame—the port promenade is named for the actress and a bronze statue honors her. The half-mile-long pedestrian-only Rua das Pedras, or Stone Street, is a tropical Fifth Avenue or Champs-Élysées, packed with shopping, dining and nightlife, and it's the place to see and be seen by the whole world. "
Armacao dos Buzios, Brazil
 
 
Day At Sea

 
 
Day At Sea

 
 
Day Recife, Brazil
Arrives 08:00 AM Departs 06:00 PM
"You'll hear the phrase ""Venice of Brazil"" thrown around a lot in the Brazilian city of Recife. And for good reason. Vast mangrove swamps and waterways are integrated right into the fabric of city life, meaning that when you are in Recife, you'll often find yourself on a bridge, a causeway or a boat. In spite of its nickname, it wasn't Italians but other Europeans who shaped this city's history. The Portuguese founded it in 1537, while the Dutch ruled briefly in the 17th century and left their mark on the architecture. Customs, cuisine and music in this northeastern coastal city are so different from Rio and São Paulo that you might as well be in another country. Recife is one of Brazil's largest metro areas, with distinct neighborhoods, including an old colonial core with buildings in various states of preservation. In the Boa Viagem district, where at low tide you can see the reefs that gave the city its name, a seafront boardwalk stretches for 12 kilometers (eight miles)—a favorite spot for locals to jog and bike. Recife's nearby sister city of Olinda is a UNESCO World Heritage Site popular with visitors for its hilltop views, stunning Baroque buildings, walkable cobblestoned streets and world-famous carnaval. "
Recife, Brazil
 
 
Day Natal, Brazil
Arrives 08:00 AM Departs 05:00 PM
Natal was built on the right bank of the River Potenji, right where the river meets the Atlantic; the soil is very sandy, with dunes and bays protected by reefs which appear all along the shore line. This "City of Dunes" invites you to ride in a dune buggy over huge sand dunes with sweeping views of the sea.
Natal, Brazil
 
 
Day At Sea

 
 
Day At Sea

 
 
Day Crossing the Equator
Cruising Only
The equator is an essential component of our planet’s geography—even though it’s just an imaginary line drawn on a map. In addition to being the widest spot on the planet—a full 43 kilometers (27 miles) wider than at the poles—this is also the planetary dividing line for the Coriolis effect, which explains why cyclones rotate clockwise north of the equator and counterclockwise south of it. It’s also the place best suited for launching spacecraft because the gravitational pull gives rocket ships an extra boost out of the stratosphere. And for a bit of light-hearted fun, if you’re onboard a craft where any of the crew are crossing this imaginary line for the first time, you’ll likely witness a King Neptune (or Crossing the Line) ceremony. This ancient naval tradition puts newbies, or “Pollywogs,” through a series of pranks and tests to prove themselves worthy of being a son or daughter of Neptune, the Roman god of the sea.
Crossing the Equator
 
 
Day Cruising the Amazon River
Cruising Only
"The Amazon is a river, and a region, of superlatives. It's the world's largest river when measured by volume. With 209,000 cubic meters (55 million gallons) of water flowing into the Pacific each second, it's five times the size of the Congo, the next largest river. The basin it drains is some 7 million square kilometers (2.7 million square miles), making it the largest drainage basin in the world. (By comparison, the contiguous United States is roughly 8 million square kilometers, or 3.1 million square miles.) What most impresses visitors to the Amazon, however, is rarely these numbers. Instead it's the area's cultural and natural riches and the experience of seeing the rain forest extend in every direction. As you travel along the length of the Amazon, you'll call at villages that are not just geographically remote, but are far from contemporary culture as well. Some 400 indigenous peoples live in the Amazon, as they have for centuries. On the same journey, you can visit the 19th-century opera house at Manaus and the colonial-era churches in Santarém, Macapá and other cities. Biologically the basin is home to some 10 percent of all the world's known animal and plant species. From jaguars to macaws and pink dolphins to glass frogs, the Amazon is an area of astounding and unique biodiversity. "
Cruising the Amazon River
 
 
Day Santarem, Brazil
Arrives 05:00 AM Departs 11:59 PM
"Perched alongside the Rio Tapajós deep inside the Amazon between Manaus and Belém (but 800 kilometers, or almost 500 miles, from both!), Santarém is a muggy but intriguing jungle town and a jumping-off point for a bevy of surrounding attractions. Established as a Jesuit mission in 1661, Santarém suffered from the same rubber boom-and-bust cycle as Pará's capital, Belém. The town later had a moment in the spotlight as the nearest major significant port to Henry Ford's American utopian jungle experiment, Fordlândia, which tried and failed between 1928 and 1945 (its ruins are located 12 hours downriver by boat). Today, Santarém does a brisk business in tourism thanks to the crystalline waters of the Tapajós River, which account for over 105 kilometers (65 miles) of postcard-perfect river beaches in its environs. Alter do Chão, a Brazilian dream destination of idyllic sands, has been called the Caribbean of Brazil; and Floresta Nacional (FLONA) do Tapajós, a pristinely preserved 2,100-square-kilometer (811-square-mile) piece of Amazon beauty, boasts massive Samauma trees and a few burgeoning eco-tourism enterprises. Both Alter do Chão and FLONA can be experienced as day trips from Santarém. The city itself boasts a pleasant riverfront promenade, a few worthwhile museums (keep an eye out for evidence of the city's little-known past as a refuge for sympathizers to the Confederate cause who emigrated here after the Civil War; their descendants, Confederados, still live here today) and several great restaurants. "
Santarem, Brazil
 
 
Day Cruising the Amazon River
Cruising Only
"The Amazon is a river, and a region, of superlatives. It's the world's largest river when measured by volume. With 209,000 cubic meters (55 million gallons) of water flowing into the Pacific each second, it's five times the size of the Congo, the next largest river. The basin it drains is some 7 million square kilometers (2.7 million square miles), making it the largest drainage basin in the world. (By comparison, the contiguous United States is roughly 8 million square kilometers, or 3.1 million square miles.) What most impresses visitors to the Amazon, however, is rarely these numbers. Instead it's the area's cultural and natural riches and the experience of seeing the rain forest extend in every direction. As you travel along the length of the Amazon, you'll call at villages that are not just geographically remote, but are far from contemporary culture as well. Some 400 indigenous peoples live in the Amazon, as they have for centuries. On the same journey, you can visit the 19th-century opera house at Manaus and the colonial-era churches in Santarém, Macapá and other cities. Biologically the basin is home to some 10 percent of all the world's known animal and plant species. From jaguars to macaws and pink dolphins to glass frogs, the Amazon is an area of astounding and unique biodiversity. "
Cruising the Amazon River
 
 
Day Manaus, Brazil
--
"If ever a city were a model for boom and bust, it would be Manaus, which lies at the confluence of Brazil’s Amazon River and Rio Negro, more than 1,450 kilometers (900 miles) from the Atlantic Ocean. Like in America’s Old West, great fortunes were amassed in no time here and vanished just as quickly during the boom years of rubber production in the late 19th century. The most enduring memorial of that time is the great opera house and theater that are still in use today, and whose existence in the Amazon helped inspire the 1982 movie Fitzcarraldo, about one man’s maniacal obsession with bringing opera to the jungle. These days, Manaus is downright huge—perhaps surprisingly, it’s Brazil’s seventh-largest city. A swank new soccer stadium was added for the 2014 World Cup, and a three-kilometer-long (two-mile-long), cable-stayed bridge opened in 2011 across the Rio Negro. The Ponta Negra suburb has modern high-rises, buzzing restaurants and beaches that rival those of any town on the sea. But within minutes, visitors can find themselves in the watery jungle, the source of the Amazonian specialties like pirarucu fish and acai berries on the menus of Manaus’s restaurants. "
Manaus, Brazil
 
 
Day Manaus, Brazil
Arrives 06:00 AM
"If ever a city were a model for boom and bust, it would be Manaus, which lies at the confluence of Brazil’s Amazon River and Rio Negro, more than 1,450 kilometers (900 miles) from the Atlantic Ocean. Like in America’s Old West, great fortunes were amassed in no time here and vanished just as quickly during the boom years of rubber production in the late 19th century. The most enduring memorial of that time is the great opera house and theater that are still in use today, and whose existence in the Amazon helped inspire the 1982 movie Fitzcarraldo, about one man’s maniacal obsession with bringing opera to the jungle. These days, Manaus is downright huge—perhaps surprisingly, it’s Brazil’s seventh-largest city. A swank new soccer stadium was added for the 2014 World Cup, and a three-kilometer-long (two-mile-long), cable-stayed bridge opened in 2011 across the Rio Negro. The Ponta Negra suburb has modern high-rises, buzzing restaurants and beaches that rival those of any town on the sea. But within minutes, visitors can find themselves in the watery jungle, the source of the Amazonian specialties like pirarucu fish and acai berries on the menus of Manaus’s restaurants. "
Manaus, Brazil