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14-Day Atlantic Odyssey

 
 
14-Day Atlantic Odyssey
Starting from $3,999*

Lisbon, Portugal to Bridgetown, Barbados


Ship: Seabourn Odyssey


Departure Date :

Nov 07 2020

Optional tours are available from most ports for an additional charge.

 

Itinerary

 
Day Lisbon, Portugal
Departs 05:00 PM
"Lisbon, the capital of Portugal, is a wealth of sights, tastes and sounds. An ensemble of neighborhoods both old and new, it’s a city full of history, culture and tradition. After the devastating earthquake that struck in 1755, reconstruction began and the rebuilt Baixa area quickly became one of the city's busiest districts. From there, you can glance up at São Jorge Castle on one hill while in another direction you'll find Chiado, one of the trendiest and most elegant neighborhoods. The spirit of Lisbon can be encapsulated by the soulful musical genre, fado, which can best be enjoyed in the Alfama, the city's oldest neighborhood. Enter one of the area's old-school taverns and listen to passionate renditions of Fado Vadio, sung by amateurs, often after a round of aguardiente, an anise-flavored liquor."
Lisbon, Portugal
 
 
Day At Sea

 
 
Day Funchal (Madeira), Portugal
Arrives 08:00 AM Departs 11:00 PM
"When Portuguese navigators set foot on the island of Madeira in 1419, they were convinced that they had arrived at the Garden of Eden. Today, the experience is no different for cruise passengers docking in Funchal, Madeira’s largest city and the capital of a namesake autonomous region. Madeira’s consistently warm weather and volcanic mountains lush with tropical flowers and gardens drew European settlers whose influence gave rise to much of what it’s known for: Madeira wine, poncha (a traditional drink made of distilled sugarcane, honey and lemon) and handiwork such as embroidery. Wander cosmopolitan Funchal’s streets paved with black and white mosaics, a grand seafront promenade and old-fashioned shops, restaurants and cafés housed in terra-cotta-roofed buildings."
Funchal (Madeira), Portugal
 
 
Day At Sea

 
 
Day At Sea

 
 
Day At Sea

 
 
Day At Sea

 
 
Day At Sea

 
 
Day At Sea

 
 
Day At Sea

 
 
Day St. Johns, Antigua and Barbuda
Arrives 08:00 AM Departs 11:00 PM
"The former British colony of Antigua is something special. Just ask Richard Branson, Eric Clapton, Giorgio Armani and Oprah-they all have homes here. Known for its beaches-there are 365 of them, all white sand lined with palm trees-Antigua also boasts charming harbors and a countryside dotted with old sugar mills. At one time the island was a juggernaut in the sugar trade, and also produced tobacco and cotton. Today, agriculture is still important, with Antiguan sweet potatoes, black pineapples and guavas being among the major crops.

The capital city of the dual-island nation of Antigua and Barbuda is St. John's, the center of commerce, with international banks and boutiques as well as a lone rum distillery. Elsewhere on Antigua, English Harbour is of particular note for its maritime heritage, historic sites and excellent restaurants-plus, while there, you'll get to glimpse some impressive yachts as they sail in and out of the bay. The highlight is the restored Nelson’s Dockyard, which features gorgeous 18th- and 19th-century architecture but also buzzes with modern eateries and shops. "
St. Johns, Antigua and Barbuda
 
 
Day Carambola Beach, Saint Kitts and Nevis
Arrives 08:00 AM Departs 05:00 PM
A classic golden arc of sugary sand at South Friar’s Bay, Carambola is home to the island’s most luxurious beach clubs and restaurants. Umbrellas, loungers and optional water sports abound for those so inclined. Otherwise St. Kitts has other attractions, including a number of lovingly preserved plantation great houses, the UNESCO World Heritage Site of Brimstone Hill Fortress and a scenic narrow gauge sugarcane railway.
 
 
Day Point-a-Pitre, Guadeloupe
Arrives 08:00 AM Departs 06:00 PM
That rarest of breeds—an overseas department of France—Guadeloupe is a place where the language, currency and wine lists all attest to the fact that you're in the motherland, while the volcanic backdrop, vivid architectural palette and fragrant spice markets tell a different story. But no matter. As soon as you arrive in the port of Pointe-à-Pitre, you'll embrace the contradictions. The island's improbable blend makes for beautiful (and delicious) experiences, such as a taste of the tourment d'amour, a coconut-filled tart—think French petit gâteau meets the tropics. Pointe-à-Pitre isn't Guadeloupe's administrative capital, but it's definitely the island's cultural capital, as you'll soon discover as you explore the museums, markets and historic sites. And you're never far from amazing nature: An easy drive in almost any direction on this butterfly-shaped island will lead to rivers, rain forests, waterfalls, wild stretches of coastline—and the highest peak in the Lesser Antilles.
Point-a-Pitre, Guadeloupe
 
 
Day Fort-De-France, Martinique
Arrives 08:00 AM Departs 06:00 PM
"Some three centuries after Columbus landed here, the French-speaking island of Martinique had established strong economic and cultural ties to New Orleans, thanks to its sugar and rum production. That came to an abrupt halt when Mount Pelée erupted in 1902, destroying the island's rich trading port of St. Pierre. Tourism led to development in other areas, but Martinique sees far fewer English-speaking visitors than other Caribbean islands. Like Guadeloupe, Martinique is a French DOM, or Overseas Department, which means that the capital, Fort-de-France, is a good-size French city on a fairly small island. The supermarkets are French, the tourism infrastructure is solid and the roads are well paved, so it's a breeze to get around. Within a short drive of Fort-de-France Bay you'll find beach restaurants where you can enjoy a ti' punch, a cocktail made with rhum agricole (which uses sugarcane juice rather than molasses), while listening to a band perform reggae and the local zouk music. Most visitors head south to see the area where Napoleon's wife, Empress Joséphine, grew up on a plantation. Adventurous types can go up-island to explore a vast volcanic terrain covered with fruit farms, cane fields and all sorts of tropical vegetation. "
Fort-De-France, Martinique
 
 
Day Bridgetown, Barbados
Arrives 07:00 AM
"Barbadians, or Bajans in local parlance, consider their island nation the most British of the Caribbean: Queen Elizabeth II is still head of state, and English products are stocked in many of its stores and restaurants. Barbados is known as the birthplace of international pop star Rihanna, but it has also produced some of the biggest Caribbean calypso and soca music stars. The summer Crop Over festival is a huge carnival event. With live music and crafts for sale, the popular Friday fish fry at Oistins Bay is a fun place to mingle with the locals. Centered around a waterway called the Careenage and its handsome Chamberlain Bridge, the historic center of Bridgetown, the country's capital, was granted UNESCO World Heritage status in 2011 for its wealth of British colonial architecture dating from the 17th, 18th and 19th centuries. Among the famous figures who visited Bridgetown when it was at its peak was none other than George Washington, who spent two months in 1751 in a house that still stands today, on his only trip abroad."
Bridgetown, Barbados