+91-124 - 4595300info@cruisebooking.in

16 Days - Aleutians & North Pacific Crossing [Seward (Anchorage) to Yokohama (Tokyo)]

 
 
16 Days - Aleutians & North Pacific Crossing [Seward (Anchorage) to Yokohama (Tokyo)]
Starting from $1,799*

Seward (Anchorage) to Yokohama (Tokyo)


Ship: Star Breeze


Departure Date :

Aug 25 2020

Optional tours are available from most ports for an additional charge.

 

Itinerary

 
Day Seward (Anchorage), Alaska
Departs 05:00 PM
One of Southcentral Alaska’s oldest communities, Seward is ground zero for the Klondike Gold Rush's Iditarod National Historic Trail, a dogsled route that connected the Kenai Peninsula’s ice-free port with Nome during frontier-era winters. Though the modern race makes a ceremonial start in Anchorage, it’s inspired by the famous run of 1925, which dashed along parts of this older path. It allowed 20 mushers to carry urgently needed diphtheria vaccine more than 1,000 kilometers (621 miles) in just over 127 hours. Natives and explorers from Russia, Britain and the United States all frequented this area before Seward’s official founding in 1903. The early settlement included a colorful neighborhood known as Homebrew Alley which was erased by a 9.2-magnitude megathrust earthquake—the second most powerful ever recorded—which dropped the shoreline nearly six feet in 1964. Today this mellow town welcomes visitors to Resurrection Bay and Kenai Fjords National Park, not to mention the 204-kilometer (127-mile) Seward Highway—honored as an All-American Road—stretching north to Anchorage. In town, favorite stops remain the Alaska SeaLife Center, a research aquarium open to the public, and the steep, stony 920-meter (3,018-foot) Mount Marathon, which hosts one of America’s oldest footraces each Fourth of July.
Seward (Anchorage), Alaska
 
 
Day Homer, Alaska, US
Arrives 08:00 AM Departs 05:00 PM
This plucky little town sells End of the Road certificates to visitors who’ve motored here to the furthest reach of the Kenai Peninsula. It’s something worth celebrating: a drive down the world’s longest street that protrudes into the ocean! But walkers, bikers and in-line skaters can also experience the thrill, thanks to a 6.5-kilometer-long (four-mile-long) paved multiuse trail.

The rich fishing grounds here attracted Native Alaskans centuries before Captain James Cook claimed the Kenai Peninsula for Britain in 1778. After some Russian tyranny—fur traders forced Native Alaskans to hunt sea-otter pelts for them—Homer got a proper start as an English-settled coal-mining town in the 1890s.
Homer, Alaska, US
 
 
Day Kodiak, Alaska, US
Arrives 08:00 AM Departs 03:00 PM
Kodiak is all about bears. And what bears! This unique subspecies named for the Kodiak Archipelago where they are found evolved in isolation for around 12,000 years and can reach heights of 3 meters, or 10 feet, when standing on their hind legs. One of the world’s largest carnivores, the bears have a diet that goes far beyond meat (they can sleep for up to eight months, then wake up ravenous to feast predominantly on grass, plants, berries and fish). About 3,500 live on this tiny island, meaning you have a great chance of seeing one, if not many, from May through October!
Kodiak, Alaska, US
 
 
Day At Sea

 
 
Day Dutch Harbor, Alaska, US
Arrives 01:00 PM Departs 08:00 PM
"The volcanic Aleutian Islands stretch between the United States and Russia in the Bering Sea. The archipelago’s largest community goes by two names—Unalaska and Dutch Harbor—though you may hear really old-time Aleut speakers say “Ounalashka” too. Want to sound like one of the fishing port’s 4,300-odd residents? Just stick with “Dutch.”

In the easternmost arc—the Fox Island subgroup—this flourishing town depends more on the fish-processing industry than on tourism. In fact, Dutch Harbor netted 762 million pounds in 2014, maintaining its “most seafood landed” status for the 18th consecutive year. But visitors may be more familiar with its fame from Deadliest Catch, a TV series about the brutal struggle to harvest Alaskan king crabs—a task often called the world’s most dangerous job."
Dutch Harbor, Alaska, US
 
 
Day At Sea

 
 
Day At Sea

 
 
Day At Sea

 
 
Day At Sea

 
 
Day At Sea

 
 
Day At Sea

 
 
Day At Sea

 
 
Day At Sea

 
 
Day Hakodate, Japan
Arrives 08:00 AM Departs 05:00 PM
"If Japan ever had a wild west, it was Hokkaido. Oh, all the classic movie stuff of samurai bashing each other with swords never made it this far north, but the image of the West—open spaces, places to disappear, actual land horizons (which no other island in Japan has)—lingers.

Hokkaido's remoteness is so legendary that it figures into one of Japan’s most important historical tales: After losing a battle in 1189, good guy Minamoto Yoshitsune managed to escape capture and death by heading to Hokkaido (no one felt like chasing him that far). In one version of the story, he returned from Hokkaido to the mainland and, if you give alternate readings of the characters in his name, became Gin Ke Ka—Genghis Khan."
Hakodate, Japan
 
 
Day Ofunato, Japan
Arrives 08:00 AM Departs 05:00 PM
The warm and cold currents that meet outside the bay of Ofunato have made it an ideal location for commercial fishing. This small city, with its beautiful Goishi coastline has been designated one of the 100 soundscapes of Japan and much of the city lies within the borders of the Sanriku Fukko National Park. The geologic formation known as Anatoshishiso is definitely worth seeing.
Ofunato, Japan
 
 
Day Oarai, Japan
Arrives 08:00 AM Departs 04:00 PM
Sitting right on the ocean, Oarai has some wonderful, pristine beaches like the Oarai Sun Beach and the Ajijaura Beach, white sand beaches with shallow waters. The seafood here is excellent and the Nakminato Fish Market offers fresh seafood at reasonable prices. Other sites to see include the Oarai Aquarium, home to 45 species of sharks and the Oarai Isosaki-jinja Shrine with its iconic Kamiiso-no-Torii.
Oarai, Japan
 
 
Day Yokohama, Japan
Arrives 07:30 AM
"Until the mid-19th century, Japan lived in isolation, closed off from the rest of the world, and Yokohama was a mere fishing village. But in 1853, American naval officer Matthew Perry demanded the country open to foreign trade, and Yokohama was changed forever. The city quickly emerged as an international trading center, and while today it is often overshadowed by nearby Tokyo, it continues to be one of Japan’s liveliest, and most international, destinations. With its microbreweries and international restaurants, Yokohama has a decidedly different feel from many other Japanese cities.

From Yokohama, it’s a quick trip to peaceful Kamakura, home to Daibutsu, Japan’s second-largest bronze Buddha, and to the important Shinto shrine Tsurugaoka Hachimangu. Head to Hakone National Park on a clear day and you’ll be rewarded with picture-postcard views of majestic Mt. Fuji. "
Yokohama, Japan