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22-Day Panama & The Inca Coast

 
 
22-Day Panama & The Inca Coast
Starting from $10,499*

Miami, Florida, US to San Antonio (Santiago), Chile


Ship: Seabourn Quest


Departure Date :

Nov 06 2019

Optional tours are available from most ports for an additional charge.

 

Itinerary

 
Day Miami, Florida, US
Departs 05:00 PM
Miami is the busiest cruise port in the world, hosting a myriad of ships year-round from all over the globe. Although it is technically not on the Caribbean Sea, no other American city exudes more of the diverse tropical appeal of the Caribbean. The city is home to a large and vibrant immigrant population that blends snowbird refugees from more northern climes with emigres from all Latin America and the Caribbean, as well as sizable groups from Europe, the Middle East and Asia. From the hot-blooded Art Deco haunts of South Beach to the natural wonders of the UNESCO-inscribed Everglades and the laid-back charms of the Keys, South Florida offers a bounty of appealing attractions that make an extended stay in the region nearly mandatory for those either embarking or disembarking here.
Miami, Florida, US
 
 
Day At Sea

 
 
Day At Sea

 
 
Day At Sea

 
 
Day Enter Panama Canal Cristobal / Cruising Panama Canal / Exit Panama Canal Balboa
Arrives 06:00 AM Departs 06:00 AM / Cruising only / Arrives 08:00 PM Departs 08:00 PM
Think of the Panama Canal, and the image that may come to mind is of the world’s huge tankers and cruise ships passing through a series of locks. That, however, reflects only one aspect of this part of the world. As ships travel from the Atlantic to the Pacific, they also pass colonial towns, historic fortresses and manmade lakes that are today home to sanctuaries for hundreds of different animal and plant species. At the Atlantic entrance to the Panama Canal, Colón evokes the old Panama of yesteryear, with its historic buildings gradually being restored. Some 77 kilometers (48 miles) to the south, at the canal’s Pacific entrance, Panama City's glittering skyline of office towers and condominiums reflects the country’s dynamic present and future. Traveling between these two cities, an epic tale unfolds before you—an old-school feat of engineering, ambition and courage. As David McCullough recounts in his sweeping history The Path Between the Seas, it was a combination of sheer human might and engineering prowess that today allows ships to cross the Panama isthmus, saving sailors from making the dangerous, almost 13,000-kilometer (8,000-mile) journey around the tip of South America.

Cruising Panama Canal

"The construction of the Panama Canal is one of those epic tales from the past, an old-school feat of engineering, ambition and courage. A cruise along it today is a journey through the centuries, from the Spanish fortifications near Limón Bay to the glittering skyline of Panama City, not to mention the canal itself. Over the course of a decade a little more than a century ago, tens of thousands of workers drilled dynamite holes, drove belching steam shovels and labored with pickaxes, all the while fighting off malaria. While the French builders of the Suez Canal ultimately gave up in Panama, American crews persevered and created a route allowing ships to travel across a continent. As David McCullough recounts in his sweeping history The Path Between the Seas, it was a combination of sheer human might and engineering prowess. In 2016 an expansion more than doubled the canal's capacity, ensuring it will continue to be central to the world's maritime traffic."

Exit Panama Canal Balboa

"At the end of your journey along the Panama Canal, you’ll reach Balboa, the town that sits at the Pacific entrance of the canal. Its namesake is Vasco Núñez de Balboa, the famed Spanish explorer who was the first European to see the Pacific from the New World. Balboa’s journey was historic, a legendary feat of the age of exploration. The construction of the canal that crosses the isthmus today was also a historic achievement, to this day the largest civil engineering project ever. Over the course of a decade at the beginning of the 20th century, a combination of sheer human might and engineering prowess was responsible for the construction of the canal. A journey from Colón, at the Caribbean end of the canal, to Balboa, at its Pacific end, allows you to marvel at this world wonder, as well as see colonial towns, historic fortresses and sanctuaries for Panama’s wildlife along the way. Measured by miles, the journey along the canal is relatively short, but it is one with an epic sweep. You will follow in the footsteps of giants from Balboa to the workers who built the canal. "
Enter Panama Canal Cristobal / Cruising Panama Canal / Exit Panama Canal Balboa
 
 
Day Fuerte Amador, Panama
Arrives 07:00 AM Departs 03:00 PM
Formerly a fortified armory, this newly developed port is the portal to colonial Panama City and an in-depth look at Miraflores Locks. Also from here, you can visit an Embera Indian village
Fuerte Amador, Panama
 
 
Day At Sea

 
 
Day Manta, Ecuador
Arrives 08:00 AM
"Located on the Pacific coast, Manta is one of Ecuador’s most important ports. The mainstay of the economy of this city with some 200,000 residents is tuna—both fishing and the processing and canning of the catch. In other words, unless you have a keen interest in the tuna industry, Manta will, most likely, simply be a stopping point to other destinations in the country like Quito, the Galápagos and the haciendas in the foothills of the Andes. Even so, Manta is a pleasant port town with some contemporary buildings and a few historic sights, interesting museums and natural beauty in the form of parks and nearby beaches. Neither the Galápagos nor the country’s capital, Quito, can be visited as a day trip from Manta. If you have extra time before or after you reach Manta, however, it's a short flight to both. Still not enough time? Isla Corazón, to the north, and Machalilla National Park, to the south, provide introductions to the flora and fauna of equatorial rain forests. If even those destinations are too far, the city’s archaeological museum is highly recommended, and a walk along the Malecón pairs ocean views with cooling breezes. "
Manta, Ecuador
 
 
Day Manta, Ecuador
Departs 03:00 PM
"Located on the Pacific coast, Manta is one of Ecuador’s most important ports. The mainstay of the economy of this city with some 200,000 residents is tuna—both fishing and the processing and canning of the catch. In other words, unless you have a keen interest in the tuna industry, Manta will, most likely, simply be a stopping point to other destinations in the country like Quito, the Galápagos and the haciendas in the foothills of the Andes. Even so, Manta is a pleasant port town with some contemporary buildings and a few historic sights, interesting museums and natural beauty in the form of parks and nearby beaches. Neither the Galápagos nor the country’s capital, Quito, can be visited as a day trip from Manta. If you have extra time before or after you reach Manta, however, it's a short flight to both. Still not enough time? Isla Corazón, to the north, and Machalilla National Park, to the south, provide introductions to the flora and fauna of equatorial rain forests. If even those destinations are too far, the city’s archaeological museum is highly recommended, and a walk along the Malecón pairs ocean views with cooling breezes. "
Manta, Ecuador
 
 
Day Puerto Bolivar (Machala), Ecuador
Arrives 05:00 AM Departs 06:00 PM
Located in the fertile lowlands near the Gulf of Guayaquil, Machala is said to be the banana capital of the world. Coffee and cacao are also important crops in the surrounding farmlands. The cathedral is impressive, very well attended by the Machalenos, since it is dedicated to the Virgen de la Merced, the town’s patron. It is filled with light from the stained glass windows. The church of Nuestra Señora de Chilla has an impressive depiction of the Virgin and child bedecked in golden finery, attended by a rustic, a dog and a goat. Further afield, the Petrified Forest Puyango is the largest array of fossil trees in the world, with some measuring over six feet in diameter and nearly 50 feet long
Puerto Bolivar (Machala), Ecuador
 
 
Day At Sea

 
 
Day Salaverry (Trujillo), Peru
Arrives 05:00 AM Departs 06:00 PM
The port of Salaverry is essentially a ticket to a best-of-Peru buffet. Half an hour away is Peru’s northern capital, Trujillo, home to one of the most iconic squares in the country: the city's Plaza de Armas. The bright blue, yellow and red buildings date back to the 16th century, and—traffic aside—transport you back to the days of the conquistadores. For time travel to a more distant past—a past that predates even the Inca—visit the profusion of ruins around the city. There’s the Chimu capital Chan Chan, a UNESCO World Heritage Site, and the Mochica sites of Huaca del Sol and Huaca de la Luna, to name just a few. And for time travel with a twist—or more accurately, with an arc—there are the caballitos de totora, curvilinear fishing boats made from reed and used by ancient Peruvians, that continue to ply the waters (and serve as the calling card) of the nearby village of Huanchaco. Watching these graceful arched vessels "surf" the waves is totally enchanting—especially if you’re seated at a beach-view table with some ceviche and a cerveza.
Salaverry (Trujillo), Peru
 
 
Day Callao (Lima), Peru
Arrives 02:00 PM
A 45-minute drive from the port city of Callao brings you to exciting Lima, the City of Kings. From its founding in 1535 until today, it remains one of the most important cities in all South America. The handsome old buildings from the earliest colonial days surrounding the Plaza de Armas contrast with the soaring modern towers rising in the newer sections of the city.
Callao (Lima), Peru
 
 
Day Callao (Lima), Peru
Departs 06:00 PM
A 45-minute drive from the port city of Callao brings you to exciting Lima, the City of Kings. From its founding in 1535 until today, it remains one of the most important cities in all South America. The handsome old buildings from the earliest colonial days surrounding the Plaza de Armas contrast with the soaring modern towers rising in the newer sections of the city.
Callao (Lima), Peru
 
 
Day Islas Ballestas, Peru / General San Martin (Pisco), Peru
Arrives 07:00 AM / Departs 08:00 AM / Arrives 09:00 AM Departs 06:00 PM
The Ballestas Islands are an offshore cluster of rocky outcroppings teeming with seabirds, penguins, sea lions, dolphins and other wildlife. On shore, Pisco dates from 1640, and its Plaza de Armas is a Spanish colonial treasure. Many visitors take the opportunity to take a scenic flight over the huge, mysterious Nazca Lines pictographs etched into the nearby desert surface 2,000 years ago. And still more belly up to a bar to sample a Pisco Sour cocktail made with the Pisco brandy distilled from locally grown grapes.

General San Martin (Pisco), Peru

Pisco dates from 1640, and its Plaza de Armas is a Spanish colonial treasure. Another treasure is the Ballestas Islands, an offshore cluster of rocky outcroppings teeming with seabirds, penguins, sea lions, dolphins and other wildlife. Many visitors take the opportunity to take a scenic flight over the huge, mysterious Nazca Lines pictographs etched into the nearby desert surface 2,000 years ago. And still more belly up to a bar to sample a Pisco Sour cocktail made with the Pisco brandy distilled from locally grown grapes.
Islas Ballestas, Peru / General San Martin (Pisco), Peru
 
 
Day At Sea

 
 
Day Punta Islay, Peru / Matarani, Peru
Arrives 07:00 AM Departs 08:00 AM / Arrives 09:00 AM Departs 06:00 PM
Punta Islay is on the Southern Peruvian coast, along the Lagunas de Mejia National Marine Sanctuary where the Tambo River meets the Pacific Ocean. This is a crucial environment supporting prolific populations of birds. The town is near the important Pacific seaport of Matarani, which provides easy access to the UNESCO World Heritage city of Arequipa inland.

Matarani, Peru

Shaped like an exuberant sea horse standing on its head, Mayotte is the most southerly and oldest of the Comoros islands, with relatively low, rounded hills and a prominent circling coral reef. A collective Territory of France, its inhabitants are EC citizens. This "island" actually consists of three main islands: Grande Terre, Petite Terre, and the rock of Dzaoudzi, and is a remarkable natural environment filled with birds, lemurs and numerous species of flora and other fauna.
Punta Islay, Peru / Matarani, Peru
 
 
Day Arica, Chile
Arrives 08:00 AM Departs 10:00 PM
Chile’s northernmost city, Arica, is characteristically arid for the region, which is home to the world’s driest desert, the Atacama. The climate and terrain may not seem hospitable for long-term living, but for a visitor just passing through, they’re critical: These were the conditions that created the attractions that bring travelers here. Those attractions include a fascinating archaeological museum that claims to have the world’s oldest mummies, and a village that dates to the pre-Hispanic era and retains some of its mystical allure. There’s also a cathedral featuring a door that came straight from Eiffel’s Parisian workshop (yes, that Eiffel) and a local wine called Pintatani made from grapes that grow in an unusually fertile part of Arica. Fresh seafood straight from the Pacific Coast is the highlight of most menus in Arica, and it plays a starring role in displays at the local markets as well, where picture taking and people-watching are two ideal ways to while away a morning or afternoon.
Arica, Chile
 
 
Day Iquique, Chile
Arrives 08:00 AM Departs 05:00 PM
Iquique was the undisputed capital of the saltpeter, or nitrate industry from the 1860s to 1920. The town's historic center evinces this period with its many fine palatial buildings. After the Germans invented chemical fertilizer shortly before WWII, the nitrate industry collapsed and the city fell into decay. Today Iquique's economy is supported by its fishing industry and its tax free status. Driving outside the city into the desert, one can find many interesting well-preserved ghost towns that remain from the nitrate industry's hey-day. Some, including Humberstone, are now classified national monuments.
Iquique, Chile
 
 
Day Antofagasta, Chile
Arrives 10:00 AM Departs 11:00 PM
A busy port hard by the arid and mysterious Atacama Desert of Northern Chile. With the wealth generated by minerals flowing from the barren land, they’ve managed to build a pleasant town of parks and plazas, conquering, for a while, the emptiness beyond. See the English clock ensconced in the Plaza Colon by British residents, and the uniquely hybrid architecture of the Customs House. In the manicured gardens and verges along Avenida O’Higgins, soil imported as ballast aboard visiting ore ships was used to augment the desert sands and nourish the greenery.
Antofagasta, Chile
 
 
Day Isla Pan de Azucar, Chile
Arrives 12:00 PM Departs 06:00 PM
Where the Atacama Desert meets the sea, small “Sugar Loaf Island” sits just offshore of the sprawling National Park named for it. The region is a unique ecosystem where flora and fauna are sustained by the Camanchaca mists from the sea. A variety of cactuses thrive here, and dramatic rocky outcrops are interspersed with wide sandy beaches. On the island, breeding colonies of sea lions, sea otters, pelicans and Humboldt penguins lounge in protected peace, fussing, chattering and cavorting as you float just offshore. (Landing is forbidden.)
Isla Pan de Azucar, Chile
 
 
Day At Sea

 
 
Day San Antonio (Santiago), Chile
Arrives 07:00 AM
"A day or two of sightseeing is all it takes for visitors to Valparaíso and Santiago to fall in love. They'll find great places to eat, stunning architecture, fascinating museums to visit and myriad things to do in these diverse and extraordinary cities. Color dominates the seaport city of Valparaíso: Brightly painted houses cling intrepidly to steep hillsides along labyrinthine streets that rise from the blue Pacific. The harbor is busy with fishing boats, cargo ships, and naval vessels. Rich in naval and commercial history, Valparaíso suffered from the opening of the Panama Canal, and this decline is still apparent in the ramshackle charm of many structures. Nevertheless, Valparaíso is having a renaissance on all fronts, and its bohemian culture and emphasis on the arts are felt and seen everywhere. For a visitor, the city itself is the main attraction, and a walking tour amply repays the effort: Street art abounds along the route to Pablo Neruda's house, La Sebastiana; the Iglesia de la Matriz; the Naval Museum; and even the funiculars that carry you up the steep hills. In 2003, validating the enduring pride of porteños, as the locals are called, UNESCO designated one-fourth of Valparaíso a World Heritage Site. Stately and monumental Santiago, 120 kilometers (75 miles) inland, is encircled by the Andes. Santiago offers the visitor such important museums and public buildings as the Museo Precolombino and Palacio and Centro Cultural de La Moneda. A walk along Paseo Ahumada to the Plaza de Armas and thence to the old Mercado Central gives a taste of many different facets of the city. "
San Antonio (Santiago), Chile