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32-Day World Cruise: Path To The Pacific

 
 
32-Day World Cruise: Path To The Pacific
Starting from $17,999*

Miami, Florida, US to Papeete, French Polynesia


Ship: Seabourn Sojourn


Departure Date :

Jan 03 2021

Optional tours are available from most ports for an additional charge.

 

Itinerary

 
Day Miami, Florida, US
Departs 05:00 PM
Miami is the busiest cruise port in the world, hosting a myriad of ships year-round from all over the globe. Although it is technically not on the Caribbean Sea, no other American city exudes more of the diverse tropical appeal of the Caribbean. The city is home to a large and vibrant immigrant population that blends snowbird refugees from more northern climes with emigres from all Latin America and the Caribbean, as well as sizable groups from Europe, the Middle East and Asia. From the hot-blooded Art Deco haunts of South Beach to the natural wonders of the UNESCO-inscribed Everglades and the laid-back charms of the Keys, South Florida offers a bounty of appealing attractions that make an extended stay in the region nearly mandatory for those either embarking or disembarking here.
Miami, Florida, US
 
 
Day Key West, Florida, US
Arrives 07:00 AM Departs 04:00 PM
"One of the first things you’ll notice about Key West, after the colorful gingerbread wooden houses and the amazing sunsets, is the constant crowing of roosters. Hundreds of the noisy birds—along with their quieter-clucking mates—roam the streets at all hours, and are nearly as synonymous with Key West as its six-toed cats, the famous furry residents of Ernest Hemingway’s mansion in the Old Town district. They’re all part of the quirky charm of the United States' southernmost point, whose compact 11 square kilometers (4.2 square miles) pack in everything from gorgeous historic architecture and spectacular fishing and sailing to a raucous party scene along famed Duval Street. While the island is known for its laid-back approach to life—“Margaritaville” singer Jimmy Buffett developed his signature musical style in bars around town—it also has a flourishing creative scene, with many galleries and artists' studios as well as live theater. But back to those brilliant sunsets: There is no shortage of places in Key West to soak in the fiery spectacle, from sunset cruises to rowdy waterfront bars to peaceful beachside parks. "
Key West, Florida, US
 
 
Day At Sea

 
 
Day Belize City, Belize
Arrives 08:00 AM Departs 05:00 PM
Belize City, Belize
 
 
Day Santo Tomas de Castilla, Guatemala
Arrives 08:00 AM Departs 06:00 PM
The island of One Love sways to the steel drums of reggae. Jamaica is, after all, the home of the musical genre and the Rasta religion with which it is so entwined. Along with being laid-back and "irie, mon," the western Caribbean island nation boasts plenty of natural beauty: pristine, reef-facing beaches; crystalline waters; and a lush, jungly mountain interior. Just as internationally lauded are the island’s eco-friendly soft-adventure offerings, from snorkeling and horseback riding to zip lining and traversing waterfalls. Much more than just a beach destination, Montego Bay also promises cultural attractions, which, along with its spicy cuisine, are as much of a draw as its powdery sand and sparkling sea.
Santo Tomas de Castilla, Guatemala
 
 
Day Banana Coast (Trujillo), Honduras
Arrives 08:00 AM Departs 05:00 PM
Christopher Columbus arrived in this Honduran town on his final voyage to the Americas in 1502, grateful to escape a treacherous tropical storm. You'll be grateful for different reasons: The Banana Coast port city of Trujillo offers a fascinating glimpse into Spanish-Caribbean history. The local mix includes everything from the architectural vestiges of the Spanish colony that inevitably sprang up in Columbus’s wake to the living culture of the Afro-Caribbean Garifuna, whose language, dance, and music have been jointly declared a UNESCO Masterpiece of the Oral and Intangible Heritage of Humanity. Then there's the natural beauty of the area: the wide sweep of the Bay of Trujillo, the carpeted slopes of Mount Capiro and Mount Calentura and the dense cloud forest of the Mahoguay River Valley, to name just a few.
Banana Coast (Trujillo), Honduras
 
 
Day At Sea

 
 
Day Puerto Limon (San Jose), Costa Rica
Arrives 07:00 AM Departs 03:00 PM
Costa Rica’s Caribbean coastal port gives access to a number of natural attractions. The canopy of the coastal rain forest can be visited by gondolas on aerial cable systems at the Veragua Rain Forest Park, which also offers zip-line adventures, as does the nearby Jungle Breeze park. The mangrove forests of the Tortuguero Canal are an easy way to get close to sloths, monkeys and numerous varieties of birds and reptiles on canal boats. Visitors often combine these with visits to one of the area’s banana plantations. Alternatively, it’s possible to head inland to Costa Rica’s cosmopolitan capital, San Jose, just over two hours away by highway through lush highland coffee plantations.
Puerto Limon (San Jose), Costa Rica
 
 
Day Enter Panama Canal Cristobal / Cruising Panama Canal / Exit Panama Canal Balboa
Arrives 06:00 AM Departs 06:00 AM / Cruising / Arrives 08:00 PM Departs 08:00 PM
Think of the Panama Canal, and the image that may come to mind is of the world’s huge tankers and cruise ships passing through a series of locks. That, however, reflects only one aspect of this part of the world. As ships travel from the Atlantic to the Pacific, they also pass colonial towns, historic fortresses and manmade lakes that are today home to sanctuaries for hundreds of different animal and plant species. At the Atlantic entrance to the Panama Canal, Colón evokes the old Panama of yesteryear, with its historic buildings gradually being restored. Some 77 kilometers (48 miles) to the south, at the canal’s Pacific entrance, Panama City's glittering skyline of office towers and condominiums reflects the country’s dynamic present and future. Traveling between these two cities, an epic tale unfolds before you—an old-school feat of engineering, ambition and courage. As David McCullough recounts in his sweeping history The Path Between the Seas, it was a combination of sheer human might and engineering prowess that today allows ships to cross the Panama isthmus, saving sailors from making the dangerous, almost 13,000-kilometer (8,000-mile) journey around the tip of South America.

Cruising Panama Canal

"The construction of the Panama Canal is one of those epic tales from the past, an old-school feat of engineering, ambition and courage. A cruise along it today is a journey through the centuries, from the Spanish fortifications near Limón Bay to the glittering skyline of Panama City, not to mention the canal itself. Over the course of a decade a little more than a century ago, tens of thousands of workers drilled dynamite holes, drove belching steam shovels and labored with pickaxes, all the while fighting off malaria. While the French builders of the Suez Canal ultimately gave up in Panama, American crews persevered and created a route allowing ships to travel across a continent. As David McCullough recounts in his sweeping history The Path Between the Seas, it was a combination of sheer human might and engineering prowess. In 2016 an expansion more than doubled the canal's capacity, ensuring it will continue to be central to the world's maritime traffic."

Exit Panama Canal Balboa

"At the end of your journey along the Panama Canal, you’ll reach Balboa, the town that sits at the Pacific entrance of the canal. Its namesake is Vasco Núñez de Balboa, the famed Spanish explorer who was the first European to see the Pacific from the New World. Balboa’s journey was historic, a legendary feat of the age of exploration. The construction of the canal that crosses the isthmus today was also a historic achievement, to this day the largest civil engineering project ever. Over the course of a decade at the beginning of the 20th century, a combination of sheer human might and engineering prowess was responsible for the construction of the canal. A journey from Colón, at the Caribbean end of the canal, to Balboa, at its Pacific end, allows you to marvel at this world wonder, as well as see colonial towns, historic fortresses and sanctuaries for Panama’s wildlife along the way. Measured by miles, the journey along the canal is relatively short, but it is one with an epic sweep. You will follow in the footsteps of giants from Balboa to the workers who built the canal. "
Enter Panama Canal Cristobal / Cruising Panama Canal / Exit Panama Canal Balboa
 
 
Day Fuerte Amador, Panama
Arrives 08:00 AM Departs 06:00 PM
Formerly a fortified armory, this newly developed port is the portal to colonial Panama City and an in-depth look at Miraflores Locks. Also from here, you can visit an Embera Indian village
Fuerte Amador, Panama
 
 
Day Crossing the Equator
Cruising Only
The equator is an essential component of our planet’s geography—even though it’s just an imaginary line drawn on a map. In addition to being the widest spot on the planet—a full 43 kilometers (27 miles) wider than at the poles—this is also the planetary dividing line for the Coriolis effect, which explains why cyclones rotate clockwise north of the equator and counterclockwise south of it. It’s also the place best suited for launching spacecraft because the gravitational pull gives rocket ships an extra boost out of the stratosphere. And for a bit of light-hearted fun, if you’re onboard a craft where any of the crew are crossing this imaginary line for the first time, you’ll likely witness a King Neptune (or Crossing the Line) ceremony. This ancient naval tradition puts newbies, or “Pollywogs,” through a series of pranks and tests to prove themselves worthy of being a son or daughter of Neptune, the Roman god of the sea.
Crossing the Equator
 
 
Day Manta, Ecuador
Arrives 12:00 PM
"Located on the Pacific coast, Manta is one of Ecuador’s most important ports. The mainstay of the economy of this city with some 200,000 residents is tuna—both fishing and the processing and canning of the catch. In other words, unless you have a keen interest in the tuna industry, Manta will, most likely, simply be a stopping point to other destinations in the country like Quito, the Galápagos and the haciendas in the foothills of the Andes. Even so, Manta is a pleasant port town with some contemporary buildings and a few historic sights, interesting museums and natural beauty in the form of parks and nearby beaches. Neither the Galápagos nor the country’s capital, Quito, can be visited as a day trip from Manta. If you have extra time before or after you reach Manta, however, it's a short flight to both. Still not enough time? Isla Corazón, to the north, and Machalilla National Park, to the south, provide introductions to the flora and fauna of equatorial rain forests. If even those destinations are too far, the city’s archaeological museum is highly recommended, and a walk along the Malecón pairs ocean views with cooling breezes. "
Manta, Ecuador
 
 
Day Manta, Ecuador
Departs 11:00 PM
"Located on the Pacific coast, Manta is one of Ecuador’s most important ports. The mainstay of the economy of this city with some 200,000 residents is tuna—both fishing and the processing and canning of the catch. In other words, unless you have a keen interest in the tuna industry, Manta will, most likely, simply be a stopping point to other destinations in the country like Quito, the Galápagos and the haciendas in the foothills of the Andes. Even so, Manta is a pleasant port town with some contemporary buildings and a few historic sights, interesting museums and natural beauty in the form of parks and nearby beaches. Neither the Galápagos nor the country’s capital, Quito, can be visited as a day trip from Manta. If you have extra time before or after you reach Manta, however, it's a short flight to both. Still not enough time? Isla Corazón, to the north, and Machalilla National Park, to the south, provide introductions to the flora and fauna of equatorial rain forests. If even those destinations are too far, the city’s archaeological museum is highly recommended, and a walk along the Malecón pairs ocean views with cooling breezes. "
Manta, Ecuador
 
 
Day At Sea

 
 
Day At Sea

 
 
Day Callao (Lima), Peru
Arrives 05:00 AM
A 45-minute drive from the port city of Callao brings you to exciting Lima, the City of Kings. From its founding in 1535 until today, it remains one of the most important cities in all South America. The handsome old buildings from the earliest colonial days surrounding the Plaza de Armas contrast with the soaring modern towers rising in the newer sections of the city.
Callao (Lima), Peru
 
 
Day Callao (Lima), Peru
Departs 06:00 PM
A 45-minute drive from the port city of Callao brings you to exciting Lima, the City of Kings. From its founding in 1535 until today, it remains one of the most important cities in all South America. The handsome old buildings from the earliest colonial days surrounding the Plaza de Armas contrast with the soaring modern towers rising in the newer sections of the city.
Callao (Lima), Peru
 
 
Day At Sea

 
 
Day At Sea

 
 
Day At Sea

 
 
Day At Sea

 
 
Day At Sea

 
 
Day Easter Island, Chile
Arrives 08:00 AM
We craft monuments to our deities from materials close at hand. On Easter Island the monuments were moai, giant sculptures of ancestors, and the material was almost always tuff, solidified volcanic ash. Craftsmen worked the quarry at Rano Raraku, a volcanic crater at the center of the island and teams of islanders would transport the sculptures to locations all around the island using a method that is still a mystery. After centuries of neglect, the moai are today protected in Rapa Nui National Park, which is honored as a UNESCO World Heritage Site. Cruise visitors can climb up to the craters at Rano Raraku or Rano Kau or drive along the coast. You'll see moai everywhere.
Easter Island, Chile
 
 
Day Easter Island, Chile
Departs 06:00 PM
We craft monuments to our deities from materials close at hand. On Easter Island the monuments were moai, giant sculptures of ancestors, and the material was almost always tuff, solidified volcanic ash. Craftsmen worked the quarry at Rano Raraku, a volcanic crater at the center of the island and teams of islanders would transport the sculptures to locations all around the island using a method that is still a mystery. After centuries of neglect, the moai are today protected in Rapa Nui National Park, which is honored as a UNESCO World Heritage Site. Cruise visitors can climb up to the craters at Rano Raraku or Rano Kau or drive along the coast. You'll see moai everywhere.
Easter Island, Chile
 
 
Day At Sea

 
 
Day At Sea

 
 
Day At Sea

 
 
Day Scenic Cruising Pitcairn Island
Cruising Only
Pitcairn is the only inhabited island in a group of four remote, volcanic islands that outlie the Tuamotu Group in French Polynesia. The island is famous as the final home of the mutinous crew of the HMS Bounty in 1790. The mutineers, along with a number of Tahitian consorts, landed on the uninhabited island and set fire to the ship, which remains submerged in the offshore waters. The population of Pitcairn today are all descendants of the original group. Landing on the island is a hit-or-miss proposition, totally dependent on the sea conditions allowing safe transport by tenders from the ship to Bounty Bay landing. If landing is deemed unsafe, a group of islanders will frequently come aboard with handicrafts to sell and stories to share. If landing is possible, visitors are welcomed warmly and invited to explore the tiny community and discover the life of this extended family isolated from the outside world for centuries.
Scenic Cruising Pitcairn Island
 
 
Day At Sea

 
 
Day At Sea

 
 
Day At Sea

 
 
Day Papeete, French Polynesia
--
Relax on sunny beaches, sample Tahitian fare, and take in the effervescent spirit of the city. But whatever you do, save time — and luggage space — for shopping. Black pearls and colorful crafts fill the market and local treasures are so plentiful you’ll have trouble making your choices.
Papeete, French Polynesia
 
 
Day Papeete, French Polynesia
Arrives 07:00 AM
Relax on sunny beaches, sample Tahitian fare, and take in the effervescent spirit of the city. But whatever you do, save time — and luggage space — for shopping. Black pearls and colorful crafts fill the market and local treasures are so plentiful you’ll have trouble making your choices.
Papeete, French Polynesia