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World Cruise

World Cruise

Over the course of 116 glorious days, we’ll add to your collection of treasured memories while making new friends with your fellow travelers. The adventure begins the moment we depart, and the dawn of each day brings us closer to extraordinary wonders. As we make our way across the world, you’ll be treated to a range of enriching activities.

Featured Ports

Hong Kong, China

Hong Kong is divided into four sections: Hong Kong Island, Kowloon, the New Territories, and the numerous outlying islands. One hundred sixty-four square miles of dense real estate dominate Hong Kong Island, including enormous skyscrapers with futuristic architecture, opulent hotels, residential compounds on Victoria Peak, and some of the oldest Chinese communities in the region. All these elements create one of the most exotic and exciting ports of call in the world; one that is universally loved by tourists and its own enterprising citizens.

Mumbai (Bombay), India

Mumbai (formerly called Bombay) is a captivating city, known for its striking contrasts. The fastest growing, most affluent and industrialized city in India, Mumbai represents the ever-changing face of today's India: the old coupled with the dynamic new. This vibrant city is a kaleidoscopic mixture of intriguing people and incredible places, where within a block or two you can find modern skyscrapers, ornate Victorian buildings, and bustling bazaars.

Ashdod (Jerusalem), Israel

The largest port in Israel, Ashdod is a gateway to Jerusalem, the 5,000-year-old walled city that is considered sacred to more than a third of the people on Earth. Numerous sites exist nearby, including the Jewish sacred Western Wall, and the Church of the Holy Sepulchre said to be the site of Calvary and to contain a piece of the true cross.

Meander along the seaside promenade, or dip your toes in the Dead Sea waters, long known for their health benefits. Visit the Bar-Gera Museum to view a collection of art by artists who were either banned or persecuted by the Nazis and other fascist governments. The Yad Vashem Memorial Museum is dedicated to the six million Jews who lost their lives during the Holocaust.

Bora Bora, French Polynesia

Bora Bora, has long been noted for its stunning beauty. A tiny island, less than 20 miles in circumference, Bora Bora is dominated by the castle-like Mount Otemanu and Mount Pahia, two volcanic peaks with lush tropical slopes. A protective coral reef encloses Bora Bora, and the lagoon is dotted with colorful motus, or islets. Perfect white-sand beaches give way to brilliant turquoise and sapphire-colored waters, and locals in the small village of Viatape sell colorful fabrics, sculptures carved from native wood and precious black pearls.

Dubrovnik, Croatia

Founded in the 7th century, Dubrovnik rose to greatness as a merchant state, independent republic and cultural crossroads. The traffic-free Old Town has been called a Croatian Athens. This UNESCO designated World Heritage Site is a living museum of the ages with fortifications, chapels, monastic cloisters and Europe's second-oldest synagogue crowded into its ancient walls. Relax at a sidewalk café, listen to the chimes of the 14th-century bell tower or join the promenade down the palace-lined avenue known as the Stradun.

Sydney, Australia

Sydney is a cosmopolitan, multicultural city surrounded by golden sand beaches, World Heritage areas, lush national parks and acclaimed wine regions. Sydney owes much of its splendor to its magnificent harbor. Arriving by ship provides an unequaled impression, showing off the city's famous landmarks: the dramatic white sails of the iconic Opera House and the celebrated Harbor Bridge, looming over the skyline.

Venice, Italy

The first settlement of the marshy islands in the lagoon was for protection from barbarian tribes that terrorized mainland farms and villages. Island living quickly led to the development of skills in handling boats, then ships. Maritime trade conducted by shrewd merchants brought great wealth, which permitted the building of palaces, churches and monuments. The city became the center of the vast Venetian empire, its name forever summoning visions of grandeur, magnificence, richness, graciousness and beauty. Although later linked to the mainland, first by a railway bridge built in 1848 and then by a motor causeway in 1930, this island city will always be considered the "Queen of the Sea." There are no cars in Venice; all transportation is by boat or on foot along the time-worn, cobblestone streets and across some 400 bridges that span the city's 177 canals. Enchanting Venice truly offers an atmosphere that exists nowhere else.